Teague Tx

Wed
26
Jul

Jerry Tubbs

Jerry Tubbs
March 17, 1951
July 15, 2017

Wed
11
Jan

Grease wows crowd

Danny Zuko (played by Josh Folsom) and Marty Maraschino (played by Jenna Swinburn) took a breather after the three-day performance of Grease Live! produced by the Teague High School Theater group.

Photo by Helen Pickett

Wed
29
Jun

What kind of news do you like? -- Blood and gore?

In more than half a century in the news business (and still counting), it seems inescapable that the general public is drawn to “bad news.” It just seems to be in our nature to gawk and almost revel at scenes of misery and tragedy.
One of the best arguments showing folks propensity for “blood and gore,” is a car wreck on a busy, major thoroughfare.
Naturally, the traffic on the side where the accident occurred is either stopped or crawling along. On the opposite side of the road, for no apparent good reason, traffic is creeping its way past the scene.
Why?
It is my contention that most of us are, if not downright bloodthirsty, drawn to “bad news.” That is, I believe we seem to thrive on someone else’s troubles.
And, that, brothers and sisters, is why the news media will almost always go with the most horrific news as the headline lead story. Morbid curiosity. It’s in every one of us.

Thu
23
Jun

Cousin Dooley and his sleek, black 1950 Mercury

Perhaps junior high age boys aren’t as gullible and impressionable as they were when I was that age.
In my hometown, one campus served both the high school and the junior high, grades 7-12, with 210 students total. If you wanted to be the Big Man on Campus (BMOC), you either had a really long wait or it was never. The latter was the norm.
I was in my first year on that campus, located on Main Street that also doubled as U.S. Highway 84.
During that year, I had a big boost in my status (at times, at least) since my cousin Dooley lived in a rooming house cat-a-corner from the campus. Dooley had returned from military service, had gone to work for the railroad and had bought himself a brand new black 1950 Mercury 2-door.

Wed
08
Jun

Memory jogged about those who gave me a leg up in life

Some of us are blessed to have true blood brothers. I have three, all younger, and they each can give me a giant case of puffy chest.
If you have friends so cherished that you feel they are truly brothers, then you are doubly blessed as I am.
Sometimes, things happen in life that jog my memory concerning those who have made invaluable contributions to my life.
Two natural brothers — Rigby Owen Jr. and Steve Owen — have been major players for me all of my adult life. I have been in their employment and also in business as a partner with them. What I have gained from their friendship and “brotherhood” is immeasurable. And, thankfully, it continues.
“Big brother” Steve jogged my memory a little deeper recently when he sent me a book about a man — Don Reid Jr. — who was a major influence and helper in my college years.

Wed
08
Jun

Dry Gulch searches for Vickers family after find

The family Bible, dating back to 1884, was just one of the items found in a storage building purchased by Christie and Mike Harper, owners of Dry Gulch Mercantile.

Photo by April Walker

Dry Gulch Mercantile owners Christie and Mike Harper are asking for help from area residents after stumbling upon lost family property. The Harper's purchased a storage unit and discovered Bibles dating back to the 1800s, as well as old photos, belonging to Sarah Vickers Chancellor.

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Wed
01
Jun

Great thing about my job: meeting interesting people

Several years ago, one of our nieces spent part of a day riding around with Life Mate Julie while she tracked down news. After a while she said “You have a great job; you get to get in everyone’s business and you get paid for it.”
Perhaps that’s how some people might see it, but one of the very best things about our business is the interesting people we get to meet. And, if we’re lucky, we get to know them well.
One of the first interesting and delightful people I met when I moved to Jasper was attorney Joe Tonahill.
Tonahill was a personal injury-trial attorney with quite the reputation for winning big sums of money for his clients. Most of his cases were of a personal injury nature.
Of course, I’d heard of him before we met. His time in the headlines had little to do with the majority of his cases. What got him the big headlines was a national trial.

Wed
01
Jun

Gary Mennerick

Gary Mennerick

Gary Wayne Mennerick, 57, of Fairfield, passed away Saturday, May 28, at his residence. Graveside services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 1, at Lake Chapel Cemetery. Gary was born August 22, 1958, in Dallas, to parents John Wayne and Ethel Carra Hancock Mennerick. He had been a resident of Fairfield over 15 years having moved from LaRue, Texas. He was employed as a heavy equipment operator with Zoch Construction. He and his wife, Sharon had been married since December 3, 2001.

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Wed
18
May

Alberta L. Harvey

Alberta Harvey

Alberta L. Harvey was born November 11, 1965, in Jackson, Mississippi, to Robert Harvey, Sr. and Alberta M. Harvey. The family of Alberta L. Harvey let her go with the Angelic Host on May 5. Viewing and visitation was held from 6 to 8 p.m. at Moore's Angelic Funeral Home Chapel Friday, May 13. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 14, at Moore's Angelic Chapel in Teague. Interment followed in the Grove Island Cemetery in Teague. Ms. Harvey attended Byram High School in Jackson, Mississippi. She also attended Tyler Jr. College in Tyler, and Navarro Jr. College in Corsicana. She received her Christian Education at Mt. Eva Missionary Baptist Church in Terry, Mississippi; Union Primitive Baptist Church in Teague and Salvation Lighthouse Church of God In Christ in Mexia. Ms. Harvey was employed at Shamrock Ministry in Tyler; Texas and Security Support; and Mexia State School in Mexia. Her passion was for reading, computer science, and spending time with "Pooh" (Ariana).

Wed
11
May

On small town newspapers and microphone thrusters

Folks at small town newspapers for any length of time have been subjected to “microphone thrusters” at Friday night football games.
Over the years, I have found that small town radio stations are faced with some of the same problems as country newspapers, principally a shortage of help that leads to a lot of double duty. And, despite some natural enmity, bred by the competitiveness to be the best news medium in your town, there comes a natural tendency to latch onto a little help from “the enemy” in certain situations. That enmity never seemed to spill over into real war. Some even conceded that helping each other out never seemed to be impeded by the competitiveness.

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