History

Wed
09
May

Now and Then

May 13, 1943

Twister Strikes New Providence; Three Injured – A twister swept through the New Providence community, west of Freestone, about 10:30 Monday morning, devastating a strip of three or four miles long. Mr. and Mrs. Delmer Wren and Mrs. Wren's mother, Mrs. Rogers, lost their homes and were seriously injured and are in a Teague hospital. Jim Rockey's house was completely demolished. Considerable damaged was done to homes and outbuildings on the farms of W.B. Bond, Green Miller, John Stephenson, and Ben Cockrum. Other damage was done throughout the path of the storm.

Wed
02
May

Capt. F.B. Lancaster reported dead by War Dept.

F.B. Lancaster

Published in the May 6, 1943 edition of the Recorder.

Fri
27
Apr

Now and Then

April 28, 1943

Native Citizen of County Dies Tuesday – Henry York, 61, lifelong resident of this immediate section died Tuesday. Burial was in Steward's Mill cemetery Wednesday afternoon under direction of Burleson Funeral Home, after religious services conducted by the Rev. H.L. McKissack. Near surviving relatives are three children, Mrs. Irene Beck of Houston; and Edward York in the armed services; two sisters, Mrs. Madison Henderson and Mrs. Wealthy Smith of Fairfield; and a brother, Jim York of Fairfield.

Wed
18
Apr

Now and Then

April 22, 1943

Freestone Co. Sailor Officially Announced Dead – TEAGUE – Eugene Debs French, aviation machinist's mate, second class, was officially announced as dead today by the Navy in its latest casualty list, which brings to 24, 797 the total casualties announced up to date. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L.S. French of Teague.

Thu
12
Apr

Cotton Gin once boasted Masonic Lodge 154

Published in the April 11, 1968 edition of the Recorder

Wed
21
Mar

Mexia Father Waits For Word Of Pilot

Capt. F.B. Lancaster

Published in the Fairfield Recorder March 25, 1943

Wed
11
Oct

Freestone County makes headlines in 1887

Fairfield Recorder newspaper – Sept. 2, 1887 edition
Mad Dogs
A dog belonging to Mr. J.I. Bonner, of our town, showed signs of hydrophobia Tuesday going about town biting every dog that came its way. It was decided that he was mad and the doctor had him and another valuable dog killed at once. For fear of a sad accident, let everyone watch his dogs carefully for two or three weeks; and where a dog is known to have been bitten, it ought to be promptly killed. Dogs are much valued sometimes, but the risk is too great to always wait and see if the bitten dogs become diseased. Dogs have been known to go mad a month after they were bit, that is, after they had been turned loose after they had been tied or kept confined. The first premonitory signs of rabies, we believe, are the emitting of a frothy slobber from the mouth, a disposition to be restless, and then snapping at everything in its way.
The Dallas Weekly Herald – January 13, 1877

Wed
04
Oct

The Good Docs of San Antonio

Early Texas doctors, as the old saying goes, buried their mistakes. But 19th century physicians were not without their skills. James H. Cook, for one, found himself badly in need of a doctor. A buffalo hunter and later cowboy, Cook and several of his colleagues encountered a party of hostile Indians somewhere in Southwest Texas. Cook did not know he and his friends had ridden into trouble until he heard someone fire a shot.

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Wed
26
Jul

Rob's Drive In New Chapter In Family Story

The following article was written by Sandra Phillips and published in the October 21, 1971 edition of The Fairfield Recorder.

Wed
11
Jan

Texas icons cowboy boots

Wearing cowboy boots today? Unless you've been horseback riding, you're wearing those boots more because they are Texas icons than for practicality. Boots were specifically designed for saddle sitters: The narrow toes facilitate placing your feet in the stirrups, the high heels help keep them there, the strong soles make it easier to stand in the stirrups and the high tops protect your ankles in brush country. These days, of course, most Texans who wear boots pull them on because they represent us. Yankees expect their vision of a Texan to wear boots.

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